FAQ's

Q. What is Reef eScape?
Q. Everybody says that an aquarium is a lot of work, so why should I get one?
Q. What good is an aquarium? I want one, but I need help convincing my spouse.

Q. Will an aquarium add humidity to my house and if so what problems does that create?  Do I need to worry about spills and leaks?
Q. I'm a beginner, what would be the best size tank for me?
Q. Where is the best location in my house to put an aquarium?  Is it bad to have it near or in front of a window?
Q. I'm really into it now, how big a tank can I get before the floor caves in?

Q. What does "flow" mean?
Q. How long can they be left alone - while on vacation or away?
Q. How long do fish live?
Q. How often do I have to test the water condition?
Q. What happens if I have a power failure?
Q. What are the pretty colorful “flowers” I see in the salt water tanks?
Q. Can we have Nemo and Dorrie in our aquarium?
Q. Can I have sea turtles, sharks, octopus, barracuda and/or squid in my saltwater fish tank?

Q. What is the difference between a “Fish Tank” and a “Reef Tank?”
Q. I have too much money and it makes my pockets heavy.  Can you help me?
Q. How much electricity does a fish tank use?
Q. How much light does an aquarium need?

Q. How many fish can I have?
Q. How much coral can I have?
Q. Other than fish, what I can get?
Q. How long does it take before I have an aquarium?
Q. Where can I put my aquarium?
Q. How much does an aquarium cost?
Q: I have a Fresh Water aquarium and I’d like to convert it to saltwater.  Can this be done?
Q. Okay, so then, how much will the whole system cost?
Q. Who will take care of my reef aquarium?
Q. How much does an aquarium weigh?
Q. What kinds of animals can I have?

Q. How hard is it for ME to maintain?
Q. How hard is it for Reef eScape to maintain?
Q. What areas do you serve?
Q. Do I want a Glass or Acrylic (AKA: plastic, Plexiglas) aquarium? What are the advantages and disadvantages of each?
Q. How often do I have to clean a saltwater aquarium?
Q. What are your service hours?
Q. What are your emergency hours?
Q. How hard is it to upgrade to a bigger aquarium?
Q. What is Ich? 
Q. Where do the fish you offer come from?

Q. Where do coral come from?
Q. What is “Live Rock?”  Is it really alive? Why do they call it that?
Q. How do I get rid of nuisance algae?

Q. Can you move an aquarium for me?
Q. Do you want to buy my used aquarium?
Q. Should I buy a new aquarium or a used one I found on Craig’s List?
Q: I have a piece of equipment I don’t know how to install, can you do it for me?
Q. What is the 1st step in getting an aquarium?
Q. I already have an aquarium, and I’m not happy with it or I don’t like having to do all the work myself.  OR I have an aquarium service provider and I am not happy with them.   Can you help?

Q. Will you come to our location to help plan our aquarium?

Answers

Q. What is Reef eScape?
A.
Reef eScape is an aquarium design, installation and maintenance company.  We have an aquarium design showroom and retail store. We offer aquarium sales, installation, service, maintenance, equipment, livestock (fish, coral, inverts etc) and everything else our customers need to maintain their aquarium. We can help you if you are just starting to plan for a future aquarium OR if you already have one and are unhappy with it.
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Q. Everybody says that an aquarium is a lot of work, so why should I get one?
A.
For some people that “work” is a hobby.  Like a model railroad, stamp or baseball card collection the “aquarium journey” can be its own reward.  Homes listing an aquarium / fish as a pet are out numbered only by dogs and cats. While greatly outnumbered by fresh water aquaria industry research from the Marine Aquarium Council (MAC) and other aquarium trade organizations show that more than 600,000 homes and offices in the United States have a marine aquarium. Marine aquaria tend to be larger, more expensive and more impressive with greater variety of color and more exotic livestock.

HOWEVER, some people just want to enjoy the colorful beauty, nature, graceful motion and peaceful aspects of a piece of “Living Art” in their home or office without any of that “work.”  Everyone at Reef eScape started out as one of those hobbyists and we will come to you and do all the work (we hope you don’t mind if we enjoy ourselves while we are doing it.)
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Q.  What good is an aquarium? I want one, but I need help convincing my spouse.
A. Ask any aquarium owner and they will tell you about the peaceful feeling they get from their aquarium, the interest and excitement children show when they see it, and the impression it makes on their guests.  The same live animals that people fly around the world, stay in expensive hotels, and spend entire days on a boat to see for a few moments on a scuba or snorkel dive can be found inside our reef aquaria 24 hours a day 7 days a week.  Finally, show your spouse some of these pictures: Photo Galleryand tell them that most of these customers don’t have to spend any time at all “working” on their aquarium.   Still not convinced?  Read our testimonials page.
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Q.  Will an aquarium add humidity to my house and if so what problems does that create?  Do I need to worry about spills and leaks?
A. Every aquarium has some degree of evaporation, in some cases this is comparable to the amount of water given off by household plants... less than is evaporated due to showers, baths, cooking and cleaning dishes.  While rare, it is possible that this extra moisture or water from spills or leaks can cause trouble if not handled properly.  However, having a professional design and install your aquarium greatly reduces the risk of spills, leaks and excessive evaporation.  It is often said that there are 2 kinds of aquarium hobbyists: Those that have had a flood, and those that are going to have a flood.  At Reef eScape we pride ourselves in preventing these floods before they occur through time tested designs, high quality materials and equipment and professional installations.

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Q. I'm a beginner, what would be the best size tank for me? 
A. Smaller tanks have less complex filtration systems and are less stable than larger ones, so they can be more challenging however they are less expensive and take up less space.    
We find that when we maintain an aquarium for a customer anything smaller than 100 gallons is about the same amount of work.  The amount of time it takes to prepare for a visit, drive there, test water parameters, acclimate new livestock, maintain a service record and consult with the customer is the same regardless of the size of the aquarium.  So, our price to service an aquarium of any size under 100 gallons is the same (with adjustments based on other variables.)

Regardless of whether you plan to care for the aquarium yourself or plan on having someone do it for you, the real question is: what is the right aquarium for you?  We can help you answer that question.
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Q. Where is the best location in my house to put an aquarium?  Is it bad to have it near or in front of a window?
A. Yes uncontrolled sunlight can create problems.  These problems can and will be made worse if poor decisions are made regarding filtration.  That said, some aquaria are kept using only sunlight, so it isn’t necessarily going to prevent you from having an aquarium in a given location.
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Q. I'm really into it now, how big a tank can I get before the floor caves in?
A. That depends on where you decide to put it, what is under it, and whether or not you are willing and able to reinforce the floor underneath.  Tanks under 100 gallons are possible in most places.  100-220 gallons can be done along most load bearing walls perpendicular to the floor joists without reinforcement. 200-400 gallons may be possible with minor reinforcement of the structure.  400+ gallon aquaria can work on concrete ground level floors, in some buildings with major reinforcement, in some commercial buildings with approval from a structural / civil engineer and no additional improvements and when the load is factored into the original design and construction of a new building.
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Q. What does "flow" mean?
A. Often we talk about: lighting, water quality, and water flow as being the 3 most critical factors to coral.  Flow is the current, or flow of water over and around the coral.  Some coral like lots and lots of flow and others like less or even very little.  If you want different types of coral that fit into all 3 groups we will plan your aquarium to have high, medium and low flow areas.  We can also plan for your aquarium to have “wave making” devices that create inconsistent patterns of flow.   Recreating the randomness of the ocean’s currents can lead to a more interesting appearance of corals, make fish feel more comfortable, and give those fish more exercise (which is good for them.)
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Q. How long can they be left alone - while on vacation or away?
A. To leave the aquarium unattended for 4-7 days is usually not a problem if it is only very occasional… but this is depending on the types of animals you keep… some animals need to be feed more often than others.   If you will be gone for a longer time (8+ days) or very often (more than one 4-7 day period every few months) you may want to use an automatic feeder. These feeders only work with dry foods, and while their quality has improved recently, we do recommend fresh-frozen foods.  So, if you will be gone very frequently (more than 30% of the time) we would suggest you have someone feed your fish for you while you are away.

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Q. How long do fish live?
A. It depends on the species and how long it was alive before it got to your aquarium.  Many of our fish have lived for 10 years or more.  Some species only seem to make it 2 or 3.
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Q. How often do I have to test the water condition?
A. Ideally all major water parameters are tested once a week with a regular dosing schedule to replenish the depleted Calcium, Alkalinity, Magnesium, Strontium, Iodine, Iron, and Potassium.
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Q. What happens if I have a power failure?
A. Short power failures of 24 hours or less can usually be managed with a small battery operated air pump… as long as the temperature can be kept stable in summer or winter (easier for larger tanks than small ones.)  Power outages longer than 24 hours may require a power inverter (hooked up to a car battery) or a generator.
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Q. What are the pretty colorful “flowers” I see in the salt water tanks?
A: That is coral, which is a colony of small animals, not a plant or a flower.  Living in the very stable ocean for millions of years they have not evolved to be able to deal with environmental changes so they are VERY delicate and react poorly to any changes in water quality. These coral get some of their energy from symbiotic single cell algae called zooxanthellae that live within the tissue of the coral.  It is this algae that needs intense lighting to perform photosynthesis.   Most of our customers have captive raised live coral that grows and thrives in their aquarium, a few have fake synthetic coral.
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Q. Can we have Nemo and Dorrie in our aquarium? 
A: Nemo, and his father Marlin are Ocellaris (sometimes called “False Percula”) clownfish.  They are the most popular saltwater aquarium fish on the planet and can live in tanks as small as 5 gallons and as large as 1,000+.  They are captive raised, hardy, easy to care for (compared to some other fish) have a great personality and “host” in sea anemones.  Some people suggest that the fish is popular because of the Disney Movie, we would suggest that the orange and white striped clownfish was in the movie because it is so popular.  
Dorrie, is a different story.  Dorrie is a Tang, specifically a Hippo Tang.  Tangs are often a good choice for mid size (100 gallons +) and larger aquaria, but they are not the easiest fish to keep.  They have a good peaceful demeanor, interesting personality, are “Reef Safe” (they don’t eat or bother coral, shrimp, crabs, snails, or other critters we often have in a reef aquarium.)   However, all tangs are more susceptible to a condition called Ich, need extra swimming space, and as natural herbivores, they need lots of veggies in their diet.   MANY TANGS DO MAKE GOOD AQUARIUM INHABITANTS, but the Hippo Tang “Dorrie” is of the most difficult in the group, and most susceptible to Ich
.
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Q. Can I have sea turtles, sharks, octopus, barracuda and/or squid in my saltwater fish tank?
A: It is done, but generally, no.  These animals get very large and eat huge amounts of food.  In addition to being able to eat just about any other animal you might want to put in your aquarium, they would quickly outgrow all but the very largest (10,000 gallons or more) aquarium.  Unless you are considering an aquarium the size of a swimming pool and have $50,000 to $100,000 to spend on it, these animals are not good choices.

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Q. What is the difference between a “Fish Tank” and a “Reef Tank?”
A: A fish only aquarium does not have coral, shrimp, crabs, snails, urchins, starfish, sponges, duster worms and other “critters.”  They just have a few fish, usually larger more aggressive fish like lionfish, eels, groupers, puffer fish, large angle fish and larger tangs. They are usually decorated with synthetic coral or natural rock.  These decorations are removed on occasion to be cleaned and are often bleached to remove algae that may be growing on them.

A Fish Only With Live Rock (or FOWLR) aquarium is similar to the above, but we use live rock as both part of the filtration system and the decorations. 

A Reef Aquarium usually has peaceful fish, coral, anemones, sponges, urchins, snails, shrimp, crabs, etc.
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Q. I have too much money and it makes my pockets heavy.  Can you help me?
A: YES WE CAN!  We gladly take Visa, Master Card, personal and business checks and cash!

Seriously, a saltwater aquarium is not inexpensive, and it can be addictive.    Be prepared to invest time, money or both. There are ways to cut corners, but good equipment is not cheap, and you get what you pay for.  In fact, making decisions to save money initially can cost more in the long run when you need to upgrade filters, lights or other equipment. 

Many people are familiar with the old fisherman’s / boater’s saying: “A Boat is a hole in the water you toss money into.”  Well, some would say an aquarium is a hole in the air that serves the same purpose.  Having an aquarium service provider takes away the worry, confusion, and work associated with an aquarium, but it does not make it cheaper.
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Q. How much electricity does a fish tank use? 
A: A typical 90 gallon aquarium may draw 400-600 watts of electricity 24 hours a day and an additional 200 to 700 watts of lights that are on 8-11 hours a day.
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Q. How much light does an aquarium need?
A: There is an old formula that compares watts of the lighting system to the gallons of the tank.  However this is a VERY rudimentary and simplified formula that fails to take into consideration the critical factors.  Some types of lights are more efficient at converting electricity into light.  Some reflectors are better at directing a greater amount of that light into the aquarium.   What is more important than watts to gallons is how intense the light is (which can be measured) and how far away from the light the coral will be.  For example: a coral located 18 inches away from a 250 watt double ended 14,000k color temperature metal halide bulb will get the same amount of light regardless if the tank it is 90 gallons or 900 gallons. 

The best way to determine the right lighting system is to first decide what types of coral you want to have, what size and shape aquarium you want, and then plan a lighting system that delivers the right amount of light.  Keep in mind, some coral require more light than others so if you want a variety, you  can have the high-light-demanding coral up at the top, and the low-light coral down by the sand.
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Q. How many fish can I have?
A: This is very dependant on the type and size of fish you want and the quality of your filtration system.  The “one inch of fish per gallon of water” theory fails to take into account any of the real factors involved.  An aquarium with a stronger skimmer, more live rock, a refugium, carbon & phosphate removing media filters and good circulation would be able to house an identically sized tank without those filters.
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Q. How much coral can I have?
A: You can have a lot of coral.  You could literally cover nearly every inch of rock in live coral.  Of course, size and type of coral are a significant factor, you may want to have a few larger coral, or have as much diversity as possible.  The more powerful your lighting and filtration systems are, the more options you have as far as the type of corals you can have.
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Q. Other than fish, what I can get?
A: You can have: soft coral, large polyp stony coral, small polyp stony coral… the list of different kinds of coral is immense. More possibilities include: anemones (the clownfish “house”) sea urchins, shrimp, clams, sponges, crabs, snails, feather duster worms, sea cucumbers, starfish and many more.

We like to think of an aquarium as a self contained, balanced ecosystem.  We truly are attempting to re-create the wild environment as best we can. We do make modifications to Mother Nature’s design by eliminating the hunter-prey and survival of the fittest aspects (ideally everything we put in the aquarium thrives stress-free.)  There is something peaceful, beautiful and "green" feeling about the whole thing.
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Q. How long does it take before I have an aquarium?
A: If you setup your own aquarium, it is usually about 3 months before you have fish and coral. For “standard” sizes and furniture, generally we can deliver and install your aquarium within a few weeks.  Once all the equipment is here, installations are usually done in a day. With our fully cured live rock you can have fish and coral within 7-10 days of installation.
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Q. Where can I put my aquarium?
A: The best room for an aquarium is wherever you spend most of your time.  For example, between the kitchen and family room / TV room, reception area of an office or the “man cave” basement assuming it gets used a lot.  From a load /safety perspective, a small aquarium (less than 100 gallons) can go just about anywhere.  Larger tanks need to be positioned on load bearing walls with the tank running perpendicular to the floor joists.  For all saltwater aquaria, consideration needs to be made for sunlight, power supply and top-off water.
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Q. How much does an aquarium cost?
A: This can be VERY tricky and deceiving.  Often times someone sees an aquarium in a “big box” pet store and thinks: “That isn’t very much at all for such a large aquarium.” Or perhaps someone is giving away a free aquarium and stand, or you hear about a good deal on a used tank.
 

Generally, for a saltwater reef aquarium, the cost of the glass (or acrylic) tank itself is about 8% to 12% of the total cost of everything including: Tank, stand, canopy, lighting, pumps, filters, heaters, liverock, sand, salt and water.  Not to mention the fish, corals, snails, shrimp, and other animals you choose to put in the aquarium.
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Q: I have a Fresh Water aquarium and I’d like to convert it to saltwater.  Can this be done?
A: Yes it can, however the savings compared to a whole new saltwater aquarium is not as great as you might think.  Usually a freshwater aquarium does not have an internal overflow box, and saltwater tanks do.  Filtration, lighting, and decorations are usually specific to salt or freshwater systems, so most of that equipment should be replaced.
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Q. Okay, so then, how much will the whole system cost?
A: There are numerous factors that have an impact on total cost.  To answer this question, we need to answer other questions first.  How large of an aquarium do you want to have? Will it be made of acrylic or glass?  What types of animals do you want to have? For example: fish only, reef, high light coral / low light coral, many larger / aggressive fish, smaller peaceful fish, etc.  What type of furniture do you want to have?  Will the aquarium be “in-wall” or “look through?” We will sit down and work with you to be sure all these questions are answered before custom designing your aquarium.   Generally our customers have an initial installation budget of $5,000 (about 90 gallons, well appointed reef aquarium) to $40,000 (very large elaborate installation of over 500 gallons)
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Q. Who will take care of my reef aquarium?
A: Some of our customers plan to care for the aquarium themselves; others want to enjoy the aquarium without the work and hassle or learning curve associated with maintaining the system themselves.  We can help you either way.
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Q. How much does an aquarium weigh?
A: Saltwater is about 8 pounds per gallon.  With the tank, stand, canopy & other equipment, rocks, sand and the sump (a smaller filtration aquarium), a good estimate to use is about 12-15 pounds per gallon of display tank.
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Q. What kinds of animals can I have?
A: What kinds of animals do you want most?  With today’s advanced filters and lighting the primary limitations are on compatibility. A natural predator and its prey will not share an aquarium for long.  DON’T PANIC! We will work with you to be sure you are getting the animals you want most, without risk of a conflict.
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Q. How hard is it for ME to maintain?
A: It’s not easy, especially if you have never done it before.  However, for most people that have the motivation to learn though books, online resources and trial and error (which may include preventable losses of livestock) keeping a beautiful saltwater aquarium is not out of reach. Plan to learn a lot, and spend 4-5 hours a week cleaning, testing and maintaining the aquarium.  The question is, do you WANT to take care of it yourself, or do you want it done for you?
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Q. How hard is it for Reef eScape to maintain?
A: Given our experience and advanced equipment we can do the job much faster and more effectively than the average hobbyist.  While we may be in and out quickly, keep in mind, only about 1/3rd of our time is spent working in front of your aquarium.  We also acquire items and animals, spend time prepping before our visit, cleaning up after, as well as time driving to and from your location.
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Q. What areas do you serve?
A: We serve all of the Greater Washington D.C. Metro area… anywhere in Virginia or Maryland inside the beltway or within 5 miles driving distance of it.  We serve all of Fairfax County, and most of Loudoun, Prince William & Montgomery Counties. These are not “hard limits” so please use the CONTACT US LINK if you have any questions.
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Q. Do I want a Glass or Acrylic (AKA: plastic, Plexiglas) aquarium? What are the advantages and disadvantages of each?
A: For standard size tanks less than 300 gallons glass aquaria are the most common.  Glass is less expensive, more durable, and quality tanks are readily available “off the shelf.” Normal glass has a VERY slight green tint, however some tanks can be made with low lead “clear” glass.  While less common, scratches that do appear in glass tanks are difficult to impossible to remove. For custom sizes, or anything larger than 300g acrylic is more common.  Acrylic scratches very easily, so greater care must be taken when cleaning it.  Acrylic is more expensive, lighter and clearer than glass.  Acrylic scratches can be buffed out.
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Q. How often do I have to clean a saltwater aquarium?
A: With a well designed and properly maintained aquarium, cleaning the glass should only need to happen about one time per week.  However, many people that clean their own tank feel that they need to do so every few days.  We visit most of our customers each week, a few customers get two visits a week if they need the aquarium to look spotless all the time.  Some customers who are more active in caring for their own tank and are more experienced only require a visit every two weeks.
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Q. What are your service hours?
A: Normal service visits happen Monday thru Friday during regular business hours.  For this reason, we require access to the aquarium’s location via keys, security access codes, etc.  To service all of our customers, accommodate holidays, installations, and other scheduling quirks, scheduling a “meeting” each time we visit is not possible… it would reduce the number of visits we can make in a day and increase the cost of the service.
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Q. What are your emergency hours?
A: We are available to existing service customers 7 days a week and will respond appropriately to any emergency as soon as possible.
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Q. How hard is it to upgrade to a bigger aquarium?
A: If the new aquarium is going in a different location, it is not hard at all.  We simply design and install the new system, move the livestock to their new home about a week later and then remove the old system. If the new tank is going in the same location as the old tank… well things are MUCH more complex.  Usually we take all the customer’s livestock and keep it safe in our holding systems while the old aquarium is removed and the new one is setup.
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Q. What is Ich? 
A: Marine Ich is a parasite that attaches to and feeds off of fish.   This can cause stress and eventually death.  Try feeding garlic to your fish, reduce their stress and if possible (in a fish only aquarium) treat with copper and hypo salinity.  Ich is one reason it is so important to have a trusted source of healthy fish.   DO NOT TREAT A REEF AQURARIUM SYSTEM WITH COPPER OR HYPO SALINITY!
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Q. Where do the fish you offer come from?
A: Some are captive raised, others are collected from the wild using sustainable collection practices.  Reef eScape does not offer fish known to not do well in captivity, or where wild populations are either endangered or threatened.
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Q. Where do coral come from?
A: Much of it is “farmed” or aquacultured in house.   Some come from our customer’s tanks. (As corals grow they get closer to each other, and can eventually damage or kill each other. For this reason, at times we trim these corals as you would with house plants, give that customer a credit for the coral we took from them and offer the new coral “frag” to other customers.)  Still others are aquacultured or maricultured in other locations around the world.  A few of the coral we offer are wild caught using sustainable collection practices.
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Q. What is “Live Rock?”  Is it really alive? Why do they call it that?
A: Live rock is not really alive.  We call it that because it is covered with life.  We find: algae (both good and bad kinds), beneficial bacteria, worms, tiny shrimp like critters, and other life forms live on and inside the live rock.  From an aesthetic perspective live rock makes up the framework (the foundation or reef-scape) of the aquarium.  Corals are placed on it, fish swim around and through it, crabs and shrimp and snails crawl on it.  From a filtration perspective, live rock and all of its life on the rock aid in the breakdown of waste.  Usually we use between 1 and 2 pounds of live rock for every gallon of water in the display tank.  For more info on live rock, where it comes from and it’s potential impact on the wild coral reefs : CLICK HERE
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Q. How do I get rid of nuisance algae?
A: Normally when there is unwanted algae growth it is a combination of factors.  Manual removal of the algae, scrubbing of the rocks, reduction of nutrients, increase filtration, adding algae eaters, reducing the lighting cycle, replacing old light bulbs, feeding less food, performing water changes, and the use of activated carbon & phosphate absorbing media are all methods that can help reduce nuisance algae.
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Q. Can you move an aquarium for me?
A: Yes, however the effort is usually more than most people think, and the cost can be significant.  CONTACT US LINK for details and estimates.
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Q. Do you want to buy my used aquarium?
A: Generally we do not deal in used equipment.  Most of our customers are looking for new, custom planned aquaria.  However, if you need your aquarium removed we can provide the service, promise to find good homes for your animals and give you a credit toward the cost of the removal for any livestock we can sell, or equipment (in VERY good condition) that we can use.  Sites like www.craigslist.com, www.wamas.org and www.reefcentral.com can be good ways to sell used equipment.
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Q. Should I buy a new aquarium or a used one I found on Craig’s List?
A: Generally, a used aquarium is not nearly as good a deal as it sounds.  Equipment is old, and may not be 100% functional, and may not have been well planned to begin with.  Ask the seller WHY they are selling.  If the answer is: “It is too much work” or “it just doesn’t look as good as I thought it would” consider if you will have better luck with the same set up.  Now, don’t forget to add in the cost & time of breaking down, cleaning and moving the old aquarium.  If you generally buy a new car, a new aquarium is probably for you.  If you like buying older cars that need some fixing up, you may want to give a used aquarium a try.
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Q: I have a piece of equipment I don’t know how to install, can you do it for me?
A: For our service customers equipment you get through us will be delivered and installed for no additional charge.  If you are not a service customer, and don’t plan to become one (just have us do a one-time job) we can still help you.  Our labor rate is $75 / hour with a 2 hour minimum per visit+ 1-way drive time from our HQ in Fairfax VA.  Even simple jobs may require more than one visit if all the equipment, parts, tools etc are not already purchased or identified prior to the visit.
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Q. What is the 1st step in getting an aquarium?
A: The 1st thing you want to think about is an approximate budget.  A large high end aquarium can cost as much as a new car, so it is something that deserves a bit of thought.  Most of our installation customers have a installation budget between $5,000 (about 90 gallons, well appointed reef aquarium) to $40,000 (elaborate installation of over 500 gallons). 1st year maintenance and stocking the aquarium usually runs between $3,000 and $10,000+. 
Next, think about where it will go and how large it will be.  Common sizes are 4 and 6 ft wide, custom sizes often go up to 10ft wide or more.  The next step is to contact us to plan for a visit.  More details about our on-site evaluations here: ON-SITE EVALUATION LINK please CONTACT US LINK to schedule a visit.
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Q. I already have an aquarium, and I’m not happy with it or I don’t like having to do all the work myself.  OR I have an aquarium service provider and I am not happy with them.   Can you help? 
A: YES!  More details about our on-site evaluations here: ON ON-SITE EVALUATION LINK please CONTACT US LINK to schedule a visit.
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Q. Will you come to our location to help plan our aquarium?
A: We certainly will!  If part of a larger project, it is best to get an aquarium expert involved as early as possible.  More details about our on-site evaluations here: ON-SITE EVALUATION LINK please CONTACT US LINK to schedule a visit.
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